Psychology of Design, Content Marketing and Social Media

Really becoming mad with this stuff. The more I read about the topic, the more passionate I become. Applying psychology elements and influence principles to content marketing and social media design (in general: to web design) is probably the most advanced marketing technique I have ever tested. I will talk about the argument in details in Milan in a few weeks @SMXL17. Hope to see you there.

Meeting old and new friends in Milan

Just posted this short note on LinkedIn and now using my blog to let all of you (the few readers) know that I will be in Milan on 13/15 of November as a speaker of SMXL Search and Social Media Conference Milan! Specifically I will talk about how to use psychology of design to attract new audience, transforming good into epic content marketing & social media.  If you are in town that week and want to have a chat, just let me know!  : )

Coming soon

Making advantage of the calm of these post-CMWorld days and building a new content hub focused on Global Content Marketing and separating – whenever it will be possible – personal stuff, still going to be resident here, and professional stuff, going to be moved to the new hub.

We all know how blur is the line between personal and pro content today; the rough plan is to separate all marketing-related content from personal bullshit. Working on it.

#CMWorld 2017 – the Recap of Recaps

I will never – ever – attempt to write a CMW summary. Too many great, awesome, wonderful summaries all around. And so I decided to go with a summary of all recaps. The ones I will find around. Mainly for me and to complement my personal notes. Then for you as well, if you are one of those 10 people regularly reading this blog.

Day 1

Day 2

Day 3

Yet no posts

Overall

Love this extract from the last summary:

One stat I heard over and over again this week is that 5 percent of all content drives 90 percent of conversion. This led me to ask the most obvious question: why do we even bother with the other 95 percent of content we create?

There are two schools of thought when it comes to content creations. The first says that brands should be creating content on a regular basis and hope that some of it resonates with your audience. The other, says that we should spend our time and energy perfecting and optimizing the content that converts and forget the rest.

I think there has to be a happy medium. In a recent Monday Marketing Minute video, I discussed the importance of publishing frequency. From a purely SEO standpoint, it appears that frequency is king. But from a conversion standpoint, quality beats quantity every time.

B2B Marketing Challenges (notes from the CMA’s Digital Breakfast)

From the B2B Digital Breakfast, hosted by CMA (Content Marketing Association). The full post is here.

August’s Digital Breakfast took a well-established format into largely uncharted territory. For the first time, it focused exclusively on B2B content – a move that clearly struck a chord with a large and engaged audience.

The last person to present was Giuseppe Caltabiano, Head of Content Marketing Advisory Services, NewsCred

He began his presentation by asking ‘Is B2B still boring to Boring?’ He said that when it comes to data Vs emotions the perception is that B2B is more boring. This however doesn’t have to be the case with Giuseppe citing LinkedIn’s Dinner for Five series.

Giuseppe added that historically B2B requires a more rational approach, but that new technologies, new communications channels (social media) are changing the way B2B companies approach clients. And in some ways the new methods of communication, which includes content marketing, have been adopted by B2B companies at faster speed than B2C.

In terms of messaging Giuseppe pointed out that was a real difference between the content marketing approaches. He said that B2B content should inform and educate, while B2C content should inspire.

Another important point that Guiseppe made was that multiple influencers are involved in a B2B decision – something that is not always the case in B2C. There maybe as many four different departments involved in a  decision making process and one of the complexities of B2B marketing is that content needs to address all these individuals and sectors effectively.

Yet one advantage B2B has over B2C is that there is a more limited number of platforms to use. As Giuseppe explained, the distribution channels are not endless. In reality there is really only three or four that are efficient.

Giuseppe then unpacked the B2B content distribution plan citing the importance of, and difference between, owned, paid and earned media.

He also advised caution in companies selecting the right KPIs as these are different along the different points of the sales process.

He also discussed how companies shouldn’t write off different platforms – perceiving them as being just B2B or B2C. For example, there is now a number of B2B companies that use tactics like Facebook Live to illustrate the human side of their business.

Finally Giuseppe went onto nail what he sees as the two most prevalent myths about B2B content.

Firstly that the ‘humans have lesser attention span than that a goldish,’ he argued that this isn’t the case and anyhow should not be used as an argument to dumb down content.

Secondly “buyers are 67% (or 57%, or 90%) of the way through the purchase journey before they want to talk to a supplier (or to sales)”

If you work in B2B marketing, you’ll have been told that buyers are either 57%, 67% or (more recently) 90% of the way through the purchase journey before they want to talk to a supplier. Giuseppe argued that the basis for at least two of these stats is actually very thin and has been so widely misrepresented.