Gutenberg

Gutenberg

I am writing this post with Gutenberg, the new WordPress’ Medium-like editor. Now a plug-in, the plan is a full integration with WordPress 5. Well, I’m probably not doing justice to the new editor saying that it’s just like Medium. It’s much more, thanks to the concept of the blocks – you can learn more about the blocks, here.

Gutenberg has three planned stages. The first, aimed for inclusion in WordPress 5, focuses on the post editing experience and the implementation of blocks. This initial phase focuses on a content-first approach. The use of blocks allows you to focus on how your content will look without the distraction of other configuration options. This ultimately will help all users present their content in a way that is engaging, direct, and visual. 

These foundational elements will pave the way for stages two and three, planned for the next year, to go beyond the post into page templates and ultimately, full site customization.

For now, I’m simply enjoying the new experience (yet, I cannot understand how I should manage things like content distribution – eg. Twitter and LinkedIn – directly from Gutenberg…)

Content Marketing Strategy series for large B2B and B2C enterprises

Content Marketing Strategy for B2B and B2C enterprises

Short summary of where I am with my strategy series posts. While most of it has been created with a clear B2B vision in mind, the Content Marketing programs I am following in NewsCred can confirm that the majority of it is 100% applicable to B2C cases.

Here is the latest list:

One more piece of the B2B Content Marketing Strategy series

A few days ago I wrote the post “How to integrate Public Relations into your B2B Content Marketing strategy“, which is an additional piece of my broader series about Global B2B Content Marketing Strategy, dissected in 13 steps (I know, I should change that number; I will add or remove some of the steps…):

Step 1: The Case for Change
Step 2: Finding the Optimal Balance Between Central and Local
Step 3: (Editorial Process) Why your Company needs an Editorial Board to empower its Content Strategy
Step 4: Defining Local Target Personas
Step 5: Selecting a Content Hub – why Blogs are still at the core of your Content Marketing Strategy
Step 6: Selecting a Content Marketing Platform
Step 7: Launching Big Rock content
Step 8: Content Distribution
Step 9: How to integrate Public Relations with your B2B Content Marketing Strategy
Step 10: Launching an Internal Communications Strategy
Step 11: Educating Marketers About Your Content Marketing Program
Step 12: Piloting Your Content Marketing Strategy
Step 13: Finally, Going Global

In addition, here are a few short summaries, for readers who will prefer shorter/faster readings:

B2B Content Marketing Strategy guide in 10 easy steps

How to Launch a B2B, Cross-Regional Global Content Marketing Strategy – published on NewsCred’s Insights in November 2016

globe

How Content Increased the Effectiveness of Our B2B Enterprise Marketing by 3x – published on Contently’s Content Strategist blog

B2B_content_journey

Thanksgiving and Content Marketing

Only one day to go before Thanksgiving and marketers on the other side of the Atlantic (Europe is my side) are ready to take a break, turn their brain off for a few days, spend valuable time with their families and stop thinking about marketing, content & ROI.

Wait a moment… ever heard about the Content Marketing Thanksgiving analogy?

The concept is simple. The idea is to look for opportunities to repurpose the content that you already have – exactly as you’re repurposing Thanksgiving food for some time. The analogy comes from an interview to Rebecca Lieb. When asked about tips for companies struggling to produce enough content, she replied:

“I use a Thanksgiving analogy. You cook up this giant bird to serve up on one glorious occasion and then proceed to slice and dice this thing for weeks on end. If you are like most families you are going to be repurposing this bird as leftovers for quite some time creating everything from sandwiches, to soups, and more. Your content marketing strategy can be thought of in the same way.”

The idea here is basic, but straight forward: marketer have to look for opportunities to repurpose the content that they already have. For instance, eBooks can be repurposed into infographics, SlideShare presentations, blog posts, listicles, video and then disseminated via social media channels.

Jason Miller adds:

“This concept can be taken a step further and applied to “Big Rock” pieces of contents . The idea is to develop an all-encompassing guide to whatever your keywords or topics are which is written strategically instead of instructionally. This type of content is very top of funnel and can serve many purposes such as SEO, fuel for social and lead generation, sales enablement, and event collateral to name a few.”

Rebecca Lieb, Jason Miller, Alex Barca (Curata) all mention the analogy, with small variations (the Thanksgiving analogy, the Content Pyramid, the mixology of content marketing, etc.). Jason Miller put the analogy, together with the Big Rock concept, at the centre of his book “Welcome to the Funnel”.

Same model could be summarized with the two concepts of the Content Marketing Power Law and Content Atomization. The power law is more commonly known as the 80–20 rule or Pareto principle. At its most rudimentary, it’s the idea that a small number of things generate the highest impact. Applied to Content Marketing: the top 20% of posts got more pageviews than the next 80% combined. Those 20% of the posts that give us the majority of the results can show us the way forward in terms of both the topics we should be writing about, and how to frame them.

Content atomization means taking a strong content marketing theme (the 20%, the big rocks), and executing it in many, strategically sound ways. Content atomization is an idea popularized by Jay Baer; others call it content recycling. The basic gist is that you extract as much possible value out of a single piece of content as possible by breaking it down into smaller parts or different formats. That’s exactly the concept of the turkey slices.

Janessa Lantz wrote a great post about it. Other people to spot the Power Law are Walter Chen who wrote about the content marketing power law back in 2014, and has some great data on how it played out for them. Larry Kim saw this same rule play out in landing pages, with 80% of the traffic going to the top 10% of pages. I wrote a short post about the Law.

All good readings, if you are a content marketer.

Oh, I almost forgot. Happy Thanksgiving!

Resources:

Integrated Live: some tweets

I am so glad that my talk at Integrated Live matched people’s expectation. Next week I’ll slightly change topic and I will talk about going global at NewsCred’s #ThinkContent event.